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Nutritional Supplement

Pleurisy Root

  • Immune System Support

    Bronchitis

    Pleurisy root is traditionally used to loosen bronchial secretions and is thought to be helpful against all types of respiratory infections.
    Bronchitis
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    Expectorant herbs help loosen bronchial secretions and make elimination of mucus easier. Numerous herbs are traditionally considered expectorants, though most of these have not been proven to have this effect in clinical trials. Pleurisy root is an expectorant and is thought to be helpful against all types of respiratory infections. It is traditionally employed as an expectorant for bronchitis. However, owing to the cardiac glycosides it contains, pleurisy root may not be safe to use if one is taking heart medications.2 This herb should not be used by pregnant women.

    Pneumonia

    Pleurisy root has a history of use internally as a remedy for lung infections and other problems, such as pneumonia and pleurisy.
    Pneumonia
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    Pleurisy root was used by Native American tribes both internally as a remedy for pulmonary infections and topically to treat wounds.3 The Eclectic physicians seized upon these ideas and continued to use the plant primarily for lung problems such as pleurisy and pneumonia. It was also used as a diaphoretic (a substance that causes sweating) for all manner of infections.4 Pleurisy root was an official medicine in the United States Pharmacopoeia from 1820 to 1905.3
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Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

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Traditional Use (May Not Be Supported by Scientific Studies)

Pleurisy root was used by Native American tribes both internally as a remedy for pulmonary infections and topically to treat wounds.5 The Eclectic physicians seized upon these ideas and continued to use the plant primarily for lung problems such as pleurisy and pneumonia. It was also used as a diaphoretic (a substance that causes sweating) for all manner of infections.6 Pleurisy root was an official medicine in the United States Pharmacopoeia from 1820 to 1905.5

References

1. Moore M. Medicinal Plants of the Mountain West. Santa Fe: Museum of New Mexico Press, 1979:130.

2. Newall CA, Anderson LA, Phillipson JD. Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health-Care Professionals. London: Pharmaceutical Press, 1996, 213-4.

3. Vogel VJ. American Indian Medicine. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1970:287-8.

4. Felter HW, Lloyd JU. King's American Dispensatory, 18th ed, vol 1. Portland, OR: Eclectic Medical Publications, 1898, 1983:288-1.

5. Vogel VJ. American Indian Medicine. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1970:287-8.

6. Felter HW, Lloyd JU. King's American Dispensatory, 18th ed, vol 1. Portland, OR: Eclectic Medical Publications, 1898, 1983:288-1.

7. Moore M. Medicinal Plants of the Mountain West. Santa Fe: Museum of New Mexico Press, 1979:130.

8. Felter HW, Lloyd JU. King's American Dispensatory, 18th ed, vol 1. Portland, OR: Eclectic Medical Publications, 1898, 1983:288-1.

9. Moore M. Medicinal Plants of the Mountain West. Santa Fe: Museum of New Mexico Press, 1979:130.

10. Brinker F. Herb Contraindications and Drug Interactions. Sandy, OR: Eclectic Medical Publications, 1998, 112-3.

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The information presented by TraceGains is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires December 2020.

Copyright © 2020 TraceGains, Inc. All rights reserved.

The information presented by TraceGains is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires December 2020.