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Nutritional Supplement

Anise

  • Digestive Support

    Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity

    Anise is a gas-relieving herb that may be helpful in calming an upset stomach.
    Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
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    Carminatives (also called aromatic digestive tonics or aromatic bitters) may be used to relieve symptoms of indigestion, particularly when there is excessive gas. It is believed that carminative agents work, at least in part, by relieving spasms in the intestinal tract.5

    There are numerous carminative herbs, including European angelica root (Angelica archangelica), anise, Basil, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, dill, ginger, oregano, rosemary, sage, lavender, and thyme.6 Many of these are common kitchen herbs and thus are readily available for making tea to calm an upset stomach. Rosemary is sometimes used to treat indigestion in the elderly by European herbal practitioners.7 The German Commission E monograph suggests a daily intake of 4–6 grams of sage leaf.8 Pennyroyal is no longer recommended for use in people with indigestion, however, due to potential side effects.

  • Immune System Support

    Cough

    The active constituents in anise, particularly the terpenoid anethole, give this plant a delightful flavor. As an antispasmodic, it helps in gently relieving spasmodic coughs.
    Cough
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    The active constituents in anise(Pimpinella anisum), particularly the terpenoid anethole, give this plant a delightful flavor. As an antispasmodic, it helps in gently relieving spasmodic coughs.9

    Bronchitis

    Expectorant herbs like anise help loosen bronchial secretions and make mucus easier to eliminate.
    Bronchitis
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    Expectorant herbs help loosen bronchial secretions and make elimination of mucus easier. Numerous herbs are traditionally considered expectorants, though most of these have not been proven to have this effect in clinical trials. Anise contains a volatile oil that is high in the chemical constituent anethole and acts as an expectorant.10

    Parasites

    Anise may have modest antiparasitic actions and has been recommended by some practitioners as a treatment for mild intestinal parasite infections.
    Parasites
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    Anise may have modest antiparasitic actions and has been recommended by some practitioners as a treatment for mild intestinal parasite infections.11

  • Heart and Circulatory Health

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Anise is used traditionally to promote mucus discharge.
    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
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    Mullein is classified in the herbal literature as both an expectorant, to promote the discharge of mucus, and a demulcent, to soothe and protect mucous membranes. Historically, mullein has been used as a remedy for the respiratory tract, particularly in cases of irritating coughs with bronchial congestion.12 Other herbs commonly used as expectorants in traditional medicine include elecampane, lobelia, yerba santa (Eriodictyon californicum),wild cherry bark, gumweed (Grindelia robusta),anise(Pimpinella anisum), and eucalyptus. Animal studies have suggested that some of these herbs increase discharge of mucus.13 However, none have been studied for efficacy in humans.

  • Children's Health

    Head Lice

    A combination of anise, ylang ylang, and coconut oils has been shown to be effective against head lice.
    Head Lice
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    A commercial product (HairClean 1-2-3) containing oils of anise, ylang ylang (Cananga odorata), and coconut, plus isopropyl alcohol, applied once per week for 15 minutes followed by rinsing, shampooing, and combing, was 98% effective, according to a preliminary report of a controlled study.14
  • Healthy Hair and Nails

    Head Lice

    A combination of anise, ylang ylang, and coconut oils has been shown to be effective against head lice.
    Head Lice
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    A commercial product (HairClean 1-2-3) containing oils of anise, ylang ylang (Cananga odorata), and coconut, plus isopropyl alcohol, applied once per week for 15 minutes followed by rinsing, shampooing, and combing, was 98% effective, according to a preliminary report of a controlled study.15
  • Healthy Pregnancy and New Baby

    Breast-Feeding Support

    Anise has traditionally been used in some cultures to support breast-feeding, although no research has confirmed its effectiveness.
    Breast-Feeding Support
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    The safety of using anise during pregnancy and breast-feeding is unknown, though it is very likely safe and has traditionally been used to support breast-feeding in some cultures.16

What Are Star Ratings?
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Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

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Traditional Use (May Not Be Supported by Scientific Studies)

Anise has been an important flavoring in European cooking since time immemorial. Its oil has also been used as an anthelmintic—a drug used to remove intestinal parasites—though it is not considered the strongest plant in this regard.17 Anise has also been used for centuries in European herbalism to treat coughs and indigestion.18

References

1. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Gothenberg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum and Beaconsfield,UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1985:203-4.

2. Mills SY. Out of the Earth: The Essential Book of Herbal Medicine. Middlesex, UK: Viking Arkana, 1991:290

3. Albert-Puleo M. Fennel and anise as estrogenic agents. J Ethnopharm 1980;2:337-44.

4. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998:82-3.

5. Forster HB, Niklas H, Lutz S. Antispasmodic effects of some medicinal plants. Planta Med 1980;40:303-19.

6. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 425-6.

7. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Beaconsfield, UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1988, 185-6.

8. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 198.

9. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Gothenberg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum and Beaconsfield,UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1985:203-4.

10. Schulz V, Hänsel R, Tyler VE. Rational Phytotherapy: A Physicians' Guide to Herbal Medicine. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1998, 159-60.

11. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Gothenberg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum and Beaconsfield,UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1985:203-4.

12. Hoffman D. The Herbal Handbook: A User's Guide to Medical Herbalism. Rochester, VT: Healing Arts Press, 1988, 67.

13. Boyd EM. Expectorants and respiratory tract fluid. Pharmacol Rev 1954;6:521-42 [review].

14. Meinking TA. Infestations. Curr Probl Dermatol 1999;11:73-120 [review].

15. Meinking TA. Infestations. Curr Probl Dermatol 1999;11:73-120 [review].

16. Bingel AS, Farnsworth NR. Higher plants as potential sources of galactagogues. Econ Med Plant Res 1994;6:1-54 [review].

17. Chopra RN, Chandler AC. Anthelmintics and Their Uses in Medical and Veterinary Practice. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins Co, 1928.

18. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Gothenberg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum and Beaconsfield,UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1985:203-4.

19. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Gothenberg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum and Beaconsfield,UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1985:203-4.

20. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998:82-3.

21. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Gothenberg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum and Beaconsfield,UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1985:203-4.

22. Bingel AS, Farnsworth NR. Higher plants as potential sources of galactagogues. Econ Med Plant Res 1994;6:1-54 [review].

Copyright © 2020 TraceGains, Inc. All rights reserved.

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The information presented by TraceGains is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires December 2020.

Copyright © 2020 TraceGains, Inc. All rights reserved.

The information presented by TraceGains is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires December 2020.